Turtle neck debardeur

My creation combining two patterns.

The turtle neck comes from the Fall Crochet Poncho CAL and the body from the Amelia poncho sweater. I made it shorter, narrower and closed 5.5 in each side.

  • Yarn is Misti Alpaca chunky (4 skeins).
  • Hook is a 7 mm.

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for my mamy-dear

I had so much fun doing this blanket for Lukas that I decided to use the same pattern to make a huge stole for my mama.   And it is huge: she can completely snugged in.

Material

Scheepjes Stone Washed: weight: SportBall | texture: cotton yarn with a tough name and a soft, woolly feel | yardage/meters: yards (130 meters) | skein weight: 50 grams ( ounces) | gauge: 4 stitches, 32 rows to 10 cm on 3 mm needles | recommended hook size:  mm | content: 78% Cotton x 22% Acrylic | care: 40 C, cold water.

The chosen pattern comes from Liam’s Blanket by Tia Davis and it’s pretty easy: a mix of single crochet combined with double crochet.

  • Chain 102
  • Row 1: [1 sc, 1 DC] in second chain from hook, *skip next chain, [1 sc, 1 DC] in next chain; repeat from * to end of row, chain 1, turn.
  • Row 2: skip first stitch, [1 sc, 1 DC] in next stitch, *skip next chain, [1 sc, 1 DC] in next chain; repeat from * to end of row, chain 1, turn.
  • Rows 3 – as may as you want: repeat row 2.

Total weight: 894 grams for an end result of  188 x 71 cm.

 

snowtlanta slouchee

The coldest day of the year in sight, I quickly made myself a warm hat.  We may be in Hotlanta but in January-February we face from time to time a few days of ice and snow…

  • Lion’s Pride Woolspun Bulky #5 – 127 yd | 116 m in #149 charcoal.
  • Hook 7 mm
  • Pattern by Tammy from Posh Patterns – size 5T to Adult – mainly using extended single crochet and front & back posts for the border.

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join

Join with a slip stitch or join with a needle or join with a hook … choice is yours.

With a slip stitch : you would join your circle with a slip stitch into the top of the chain 2.  End of the story.

With the hook … same technique as with a needle:

  • Remove your hook; cut the yarn and pull it all the way through the stitch/loop [where the hook was].
  • Insert your hook below both loops of the next dc [first DC], from the back to the front.
  • Grab the yarn and yarn over and hook it through the stitch so that it is pulled from the front to the back and pull gently.
  • Insert your hook in the last DC you made – through the back loop only, from front to back, and pull it through.
  • Grab the yarn and hook it through that back loop [pull the tail end yarn all the way through].
  • Weave in yarn end. And voilà.

 

dotty flower

The dotty flower is a pattern by .  I just copied and pasted her pattern here for my own ease [with Jules’ kind authorization] … Please refer to her original pattern with photo tutorial. 

In order to make a pillow or blanket, Jules explains how to add 2 extra rows to transform the flowers into an hexagon.

4 mm hook, small quantities of 8ply/DK yarn in 3 colours.

Special instructions
2dc Cluster
Yo, insert hook in stitch, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 2 loops ( 2 loops left on hook) , yo, insert hook in same stitch, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 2 loops (3 loops left on hook) , yo and pull through all loops on hook.
Petal Cluster
  • Step 1 – *Yo twice, insert hook into 2 ch space, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 2 loops, yo and pull through 2 loops, leave last loop on hook (2 loops on hook) * .
  • Repeat * to *  (3 loops on hook).
  • Step 2 – Yo 3 times, insert hook in skipped stitch of round 1, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 2 loops, yo and pull through 2 loops, yo and pull through 2 loops, leave last loop on hook  (4 loops on hook).
  • Repeat Step 1 into the same 2 ch space (6 loops on hook).
  • Step 3- Yo and pull through all loops on hook.
Pattern
Chain 4, slip stitch into 1st chain to form a ring.
  • Round 1: ch2 (does not count as a stitch), 12 dc into ring, slip stitch join to 1st dc, fasten off.
  • Round 2:  Join next colour to any stitch, ch2, make a 2dc cluster into same stitch, *ch2, skip 1 stitch, make a 2dc cluster in next stitch, * .  Repeat * to * 4 more times, to make 6 cluster, ending with 2ch and slip stitch join to 1st cluster. Fasten off.
  • Round 3: Join next colour to any 2ch space.  *Ch 4, make a petal cluster, ch 4, slip stitch into same 2 ch space, slip stitch into next 2ch space. *  Repeat * to * making 6 petals around the flower in the 2 ch spaces of previous round. Slip stitch into 1st space to join, fasten off and weave in all threads.

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Dotty Flower Hexagon
  • Background Rd 1 – Join background colour to top of any petal, Ch1,  *3sc in same stitch in top of petal,  5tr in stitch on top of  Round 2 dots*,    Repeat * to * 5 times,  slip stitch to 1st sc.
  • Background Round 2 – Ch1,  Make 1 sc in each stitch of previous round, except in the corners of the hexagon where you make 3 sc in the same stitch, ( this will be the middle stitch of 3sc in top of each petal).  Join with slip stitch to first sc. Bind off.

photogenic hat

When Alyska was a very young little girl she had this wonderful multicolored cloche hat that she was wearing all the time.  And she attracted all kind of comments … and photographers.  We remember those Asian tourists in Amsterdam asked her to pose with her hat.  One day, the hat was no longer her favorite – probably because of the pink – but I kept this photogenic hat like a little treasure.

I found this beautiful vintage pattern on Honey! Crochet Patterns by Olivia with the idea to base myself on her patter to re-create Alyska’s photogenic hat.  Perhaps, this one is the closest pattern…

Photogenic hat.
Photogenic hat.

 

acupuncture for crochet projects

Out of the blue my son came up with this acupuncture comment … Pretty accurate!

I have never been ‘far’ enough to get to the blocking part.  I had so much to learn.  Still have.  But my projects becoming more complicated, I was forced into the technique.  Of course, Google is my friend and I have been surfing a lot to understand it and find the best way to correct cranky projects.  However, it seems that blocking is good for all projects as it makes them smoother and softer.

Here are the results of my researches.

You will need:

  • blocking boards [flat boards]
  • rust-proof pins
  • Spray bottle with cool water (or basin full of cool water) or steam iron

WET – either you immerse your project in cool water, gently squeeze it out [don’t wring it out] and spread your piece out to the correct dimensions without distorting the direction of the stitches on the board(s), or you can pin the project first on the board(s) and then wet it down with a water-filled spray bottle.  Either way, I mix my water with Soak, an eco-friendly rinse-free laundry soap deliciously scented [Lacey – combines spring blossoms with sweet bergamot creating a light yet alluring fragrance].  Let your project to dry completely before removing the pins. It can take a few days …

STEAM – pin your project on the blocking board(s). Hold the iron close to the fabric until convincingly damp. DO NOT touch the fabric with the iron [duh].  As with wet blocking, leave the pieces to dry.

My concern is – and I haven’t found the answer yet – if you offer one of your heavily blocked project to someone and the person washes it … what than?